Metaphorically this portrays one experiencing dangerous and difficult realities, in order to reach a sense of spiritual hope, as they must experience the bad in order to reach the good.

The teachings of Don Juan is another example which highly influenced us in the production of this event, as it explores the study of humankind in relation to spirituality, as it is based on the experience of an anthropology student, who consumes a variety of drugs whilst being watched by an Indian Shaman. Metaphorically this portrays one experiencing dangerous and difficult realities, in order to reach a sense of spiritual hope, as they must experience the bad in order to reach the good.

 

Aims of the poster

- Loss of Identity

- Find yourself, by loosing yourself first.

- ‘Spiritual awakening’

- Individual goes through 8 hours of suffering by partaking in this event (uncreativity examples of already existent artists) 

- Desert Awakening

- Finding pre-existant happenings that either happened in the desert, or related to the desert

- Section the poster, with steps of the awakening 

- Ana Mendieta (artist related) 

- The teachings of Don Juan 

- 8 hrs - Marina abramovic

- Allan Kaprow 

Assessment 3

Concept

 When does gold ore become gold? When it is put through a process of fire. So the human being during the training becomes as pure as gold through suffering. It is the burning away of the dross. Suffering has a great redeeming quality. As a drop of water failing on the desert sand is sucked up immediately, so we must become nothing and nowhere … we must disappear.

Artists/precedents

- Allan Kaprow

- Spencer Tunick

Event

- Happenings

- Performance Art — gallery work or public work

Poster

- What is seen as gold? Is it precious because it is rare and found in the middle of nowhere?

- Finding ‘everything’ through the process of searching through ‘nothing’ 

- Archaeological excavations

- Ideas for objects that can be found/or maybe not found

- Objects which are valuable through everyday life, become ‘more’ valuable once highly needed through the absence of everythingness

- If there is nothing to excavate or nothing could be found - this can relate to the course concept of unfinished business

- once a month happenings, either something precious hidden, something hidden, something useful, something completely useless, or maybe nothing at all is hidden

Nothingness

 When does gold ore become gold? When it is put through a process of fire. So the human being during the training becomes as pure as gold through suffering. It is the burning away of the dross. Suffering has a great redeeming quality. As a drop of water failing on the desert sand is sucked up immediately, so we must become nothing and nowhere … we must disappear.

Bhai Sahib Singh (Sikh)

Happenings

  • Allan Kaprow - “Yard” audience was encouraged to jump around all the tires and play and move them
  • Allan Kaprow - “Fluids” 1967 - huge ice blocks that look like a brick wall - nothingness 
  • Spencer Tunick “Opera House” 2010, everythingness - exposure 
  • Robert Smithson “Spiral Jetty”

Nothingness

"We are surrounded by Nothing. Everywhere we go, we have no idea what we’re not seeing. We don’t know what gravitational fields look like, what dark matter looks like, what quantum foam looks like, what de Kooning’s drawing looked like, but what the scientists and the artists are telling us, in their very different ways, is that if we lean in, and pay very close attention, sometimes what looks like Nothing is the best place to find the most interesting…somethings."

Unfinished Business

This week we explore the question of what it means to ‘finish’ a work. When working with process-based practices, when can we say that a work is finished? We will look at examples of works that have intentionally, and unintentionally, been left unfinished. How might work that has been abandoned by others suggest departure points for our own practice? How can we re-work our own abandoned works through a process of iteration?

Reverse Engineering

This week we will be thinking about reverse-engineering. Reverse-engineering is a design process that involves deconstructing objects in order to learn more about the processes that produced them. What can be made by taking something apart? What can we learn from examining the relationship between an object and its constituent parts? How can a conceptual process deliver a new object from existing parts?

  • Deconstruction
  • Backwards Replication
  • Redesigning
  • Detective

Hazards:

  • Couldn’t understand one of the steps
  • Chemical changes that you can’t manipulate